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1961 Jaguar Mk.II 2.4 Litre

1961 Jaguar Mk.II in Withnail & I, Movie, 1987 IMDB

Class: Cars, Sedan — Model origin: UK

1961 Jaguar Mk.II 2.4 Litre

Position 00:31:09 [*][*][*][*] Vehicle used a lot by a main character or for a long time

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

G-MANN UK

2007-10-04 22:42

Quote

[Image: withnailjaguar2iq8.8089.jpg] [Image: WithnailJaguar10.jpg] [Image: withnailjaguar3yz2.3623.jpg] [Image: WithnailJaguarScrubbers7.jpg] [Image: withnailjaguar4nl9.4641.jpg] [Image: withnailjaguar7be0.9932.jpg] [Image: WithnailJaguar5.jpg] [Image: withnailjaguar6rt9.3479.jpg]

The battered old Jag only has one headlight and only one windscreen wiper (on the passenger's side), which proves problematic during heavy rain. Also the rear wheel skirts are missing.

[Image: withnailjaguar11rh1.6910.jpg]

[Image: withnailjaguarscrubbersjz4.7577.jpg]

"SCRUBBERS!!"

[Image: withnailjaguarscrubbershd5.6.jpg]

"Up yours, grandad!"

[Image: withnailjaguarscrubbersyj6.3894.jpg]

"SCRUBBERS!"

[Image: withnailjaguarscrubbersom6.1783.jpg]

"Little tarts, they love it!"

The car's numberplate (405SBH) is now registered to a 2000 Jaguar S-Type.

In one of the DVD commentaries Paul McGann says this was the "classic" Mk.II Jaguar, the 3.8 litre one, not one of the smaller engined ones. He says that when they filmed it he'd only just learnt how to drive and was only used to things like MiniMetros, he said the power of the Jaguar was "scary" and it was a "flying machine". When they first set off in the Jag and he flips down his sunglasses, he nearly stalls it as he pulls out onto the road. In the second motorway scene the Jag had to swerve around the motorway, overtaking cars and he didn't have the nerve so director Bruce Robinson did the driving. If you look very closely you see him driving in that scene.

-- Last edit: 2012-03-15 21:18:11

kazimann IE

2010-08-04 16:04

Quote

It amazes me that two unemployed actors could afford a Jag.

Also, this car would have been barely ten years old (as the film was set in 1969), and yet it looks like it was pulled out of a lake! :D

vintage-and-classic EN

2011-02-03 12:56

Quote

Whatever Paul McGann drove, or recalls driving, the car in these photos is without doubt not a 3.8 litre MK2 but a 2.4 litre version. This can be clearly identified by the choke lever on the right of the steering column with its chrome surround in the picture posted by G-MANN:

http://img165.imageshack.us/my.php?image=withnailjaguar7be0.jpg

The choke is actually on in the photo and the factory original choke warning light is illuminated. these mechanical chokes simply don't connect up to the arrangement on the 3.8 litre cars, and there needs to be an extra pair of holes in the wooden fascia to accomodate the assembly.
Also in the same photo it can be clearly seen that the speedometer reads to 120mph. Only the 2.4 speedos finished at 120mph - 3.8 litre versions read up to 140mph

The 3.8 litre cars were equipped with twin S.U. carburettors and featured a separate S.U. starting device which was controlled by a thermostatic switch. They had no choke lever. Only the 2.4 litre cars had manual chokes with the factory fitted lever which was connected to twin Solex carburettors.

The car can also be identified as a 2.4 litre model in the main photograph by the black coloured badge in the grille. Different badges defined in the link:

http://www.sngbarratt.com/catalogue/parts/show.asp?id=16365

Thirdly the car has a single tail pipe with the correct body cutaway as it exits the rear valance, clearly seen in the rear end photo already posted:

http://img213.imageshack.us/my.php?image=withnailjaguar3yz2.jpg

Only the 2.4 litre cars had single tail pipes, all 3.8 litre models were equipped with twin pipes and correspondingly larger cut out in the rear valance to accomodate them. It's a 2.4

-- Last edit: 2011-02-03 13:03:50

dsl SX

2011-02-03 13:23

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xxx SBH series issued and completed Jan - Feb 1961.
vintage-and-classic wrote The car can also be identified as a 2.4 litre model by the black coloured badge in the grille. Different badges defined in the link: http://www.sngbarratt.com/catalogue/parts/show.asp?id=16365
Only the 2.4 litre cars had single tail pipes, all 3.8 litre models were equipped with twin pipes and correspondingly larger cut out in the rear valance to accommodate them.

Interesting info - thanks as we have loads of unseparated Mk2s. For interest, what was the 3.4 exhaust configuration?

G-MANN UK

2011-02-03 14:02

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Thanks for setting us straight there, vintage-and-classic :) Paul McGann must have just remembered it wrong.

-- Last edit: 2011-02-03 14:03:44

vintage-and-classic EN

2011-02-03 14:58

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Strewth - you don't hang about on this site :) You're welcome. The only visible external differences between the 3.4 and the 3.8 was the colour of the badge in the front grille and the chrome badge on the boot underneath the Jaguar script which gave away the engine capacity. Both 3.4 and 3.8 litre models had the same exhaust configuration and even the engines were visually identical except for the colour of the paint on the cylinder head.

-- Last edit: 2012-03-15 21:20:14 (G-MANN)

dsl SX

2011-02-03 15:03

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vintage-and-classic wrote Strewth - you don't hang about on this site :)

If you really want an instant reaction, insert a reference to Jeremy Clarkson into your comment, and then stand well back.

chicomarx BE

2011-04-30 02:17

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G-MANN wrote "SCRUBBERS!!"

"Up yours, grandad!"

"SCRUBBERS!"

"Little tarts, they love it!"


What does "scrubbers" mean exactly? The annoying thing about this movie is that whenever it's raining it's clearly a man with a hose. How difficult is it to film on a rainy day in England...

chris40 UK

2011-04-30 08:51

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chicomarx wrote What does "scrubbers" mean exactly?

Marie-couche-toi-là ... :D

chicomarx BE

2011-04-30 19:01

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:D I thought so, what else... But it can't be a word that's still used much.

Do not search for "Marie-couche-toi-là" on Google Images btw! It's nuns losing their religion.

G-MANN UK

2011-09-19 00:31

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I'm not really familiar with the term "scrubbers" (never heard anyone use it outside of this film) but here's another clue as to its meaning: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0086265/

G-MANN UK

2012-03-15 21:20

Quote

kazimann wrote It amazes me that two unemployed actors could afford a Jag.

Also, this car would have been barely ten years old (as the film was set in 1969), and yet it looks like it was pulled out of a lake!


It is a really beat up Jag. And I think cars rusted a lot back then.

smu95rp EN

2013-11-18 11:48

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“scrubber noun 1 someone who scrubs. 2 apparatus used for filtering out impurities from gas. 3 offensive slang an unattractive woman. 4 offensive slang a woman who regularly indulges in casual sex.
ETYMOLOGY: 19c.”


http://www.chambers.co.uk/search.php?query=scrubber&title=21st

johnfromStaffs EN

2013-11-18 16:00

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I cannot resist a comment, I was 21 in 1969, and always on the lookout for a scrubber for a night's fun. Instead I met a nice girl and got married (in 1974), and we are still together. Perhaps she won't find this page. Scrubber was a term in very constant use at the time, if you watch "Up Pompeii" with Frankie Howerd you will see that one of the girls was called Scrubba. (Adrienne Posta IIRC http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0067916/fullcredits). You won't find this film on IMCDB, no cars, only the odd donkey.

In respect of rust, a ten year old car in 1969 was decidedly on its way to the scrapyard. I had a 1957 Vauxhall Victor Model F which had only done 26,000 miles in about 9 years when I bought it, for £110, and it lasted about another 18 months before I had to scrap it due to rust. Examples of many types of monocoque construction cars, including Jags, with terminal rust at about 10 to 12 years could be found, but with pre-war designs with separate chassis still going after 20+ years.

-- Last edit: 2013-11-18 16:12:44

G-MANN UK

2013-11-18 16:11

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Was 'scrubber' similar to 'slag'? (this was the first time I'd ever heard it)

-- Last edit: 2013-11-18 16:11:52

johnfromStaffs EN

2013-11-18 16:17

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G-MANN wrote Was 'scrubber' similar to 'slag'? (this was the first time I'd ever heard it)


My recollection is that "slag" is newer in common use than "scrubber", and perhaps a bit stronger in its meaning, I never would go looking for a slag, but might enjoy the company of a scrubber if you see what I mean. Maybe it has a different meaning in London and the south of England, it seems to be fairly frequent on such low life TV as "East Enders".

johnfromStaffs EN

2013-11-18 17:05

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At great personal risk I have been in amongst the old magazines in one of the bedrooms, and can quote the following:

"Jaguar 2.4 1956. Ivory with red interior, recent overhaul, well maintained, low mileage. £275. Telephone Knightsbridge 2145."
Taken from "Motor Sport" May 1964.

So an eight year old Jag was £275, if I could get amongst the later 60s pile, I am sure I could find similar prices for the Mk II cars when ten years old.

To further inform you, in the same magazine, C J Bendall Ltd, of Hitchin, had for sale a choice of three Bentley Mk VI saloons described as "sound"! for £195 upwards.

-- Last edit: 2013-11-18 17:06:42

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