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1927 Lincoln Model L Coaching Brougham by Judkins [134 B]

1927 Lincoln Model L [134 B] in Car Crazy, Non-fiction TV, 2001-2019 IMDB Ep. 1.10

Class: Cars, Limousine — Model origin: US

1927 Lincoln Model L Coaching Brougham by Judkins [134 B]

[*][*] Minor action vehicle or used in only a short scene

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

Skywatcher68 US

2012-08-27 21:34

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[Image: 1927lincolnmodellcoachingbroughamjudkins134b-frontfender.jpg]

Link to "allcarcentral.com"

Skywatcher68 US

2012-09-01 06:09

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I see the plaque mentions this was in a W.C. Fields movie. I'll see about tracking that down.

Skywatcher68 US

2012-09-02 20:49

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No luck so far. Expected it to be in Her Majesty, Love but didn't see it during a quick look through. Plenty of other interesting vehicles in that flick so I'll add it later. Could be there are no existing prints of whatever this was in.

Skywatcher68 US

2013-03-05 04:30

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Finally found more on this fancy car. Seems this was only used to promote a W.C. Fields movie.

Quote For the 1927 New York Salon, both Locke and Judkins built carriage replicas. Locke's offering was the Louis XIV French Brougham, while Judkins was inspired by Abbott & Downing’s famous Concord Coaches. Built for Lincoln on a 1927 Model L chassis, it was called a "English Coaching Brougham", and was without a doubt, Judkins most famous vehicle. Rumored to have been built for Cowboy star Tom Mix, in reality it was built for exhibition by the Ford Motor Co and was based in part on an old horse-drawn coach that was on display at Henry Ford's Wayside Inn. Designed by John F. Dobben in cooperation with Edsel Ford, the car was also shown at the 1927 Chicago and Los Angeles Salons.

Dobben remembered visiting the Wayside Inn at Sudbury, Massachusetts, to see the old coach that was on display which Ford stated was the one "in which George Washington and Lafayette rode." Dobben also remembered traveling to the old Abbot-Downing plant in Concord, New Hampshire with John Judkins to get a photo of an actual Concord Coach to use as a model for the Lincoln commission. Four or five pencil sketches of similar designs that used both the Concord Coach and the one at the Wayside Inn were presented to Edsel Ford, who picked his favorite which became Judkins' English Coaching Brougham.

The interior followed the pattern of earlier coaches, with seats and doors cov­ered in tufted dark green morocco leather, and headlining of red plush. The ceiling had an additional coverlet of lace, which could be detached and washed. Small hammocks of hand-knotted string, like fishnets, were provided to hold the passengers' odds and ends, as on horse-drawn Concord Coaches. The exterior was finished in coaching yellow and black, with coaching vermillion striping.

It was much admired by Mrs. W. C. Fields at the 1927 New York Salon but remained unsold until the wealthy father of Ethel Jackson, an aspiring movie actress, purchased it in 1928 for publicity purposes. Unfortunately the car didn’t help her career – she appeared in only three movies, 2 1935 Bill Cody B-Westerns and un-credited in 1936’s After the Thin Man - and in 1931 it was sold to the MacMillan Oil Company for use in promoting the Beverly Hill Billies, a popular radio vocal group unrelated to the stars of the 1960s TV show. W.C. Fields did get to ride in it later, when it was used to promote one of his movies (1932’s Million Dollar Legs). It was never owned by Tom Mix, who did, however, own a Judkins-bodied Pierce-Arrow Club Coupe built specially for him earlier in 1926.


Far as I can tell, there is only one car in Million Dollar Legs and it's a Model A convertible.

-- Last edit: 2013-03-05 04:31:24

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