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1935 Austin Seven Single-Seat Racer

1935 Austin Seven Single-Seat Racer in 20 Cars That Changed the World, Documentary, 2002 IMDB Ep. 14

Class: Cars, Racecar — Model origin: UK

1935 Austin Seven Single-Seat Racer

[*][*] Minor action vehicle or used in only a short scene

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

stronghold EN

2006-05-13 09:35

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Yes..it's an austin 7 ..but is there a specific model name/year.?
[Image: 20cars1402sn.2710.jpg]

pilou BE

2006-05-13 10:31

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Racing monoposto Austin 750 1937.It had a double overhead camshaft 4 cylinder engine of 744 cc with a Rootes supercharger developing 90( long distance racing) to 116 hp ( sprints) allowing for speeds of more than 200 km/h

stronghold EN

2006-05-13 16:31

Quote

pilou wrote Racing monoposto Austin 750 1937.It had a double overhead camshaft 4 cylinder engine of 744 cc with a Rootes supercharger developing 90( long distance racing) to 116 hp ( sprints) allowing for speeds of more than 200 km/h

..Wow ...thats a good speed for such a small engine.! (and in 1937.!)

dsl SX

2020-06-15 21:53

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1935 Austin Seven Single Seater Racecar now displayed at Gaydon

"Stung by the success of the MG in motor racing, Sir Herbert Austin decided to encourage a factory racing team. In 1932 a private Seven Ulster caught his eye, driven by T Murray Jamieson who worked for Amhurst Villiers and was developing a supercharged car of his own design. Jamieson was recruited with the brief to design the ultimate Austin Seven. His first design was a speed record car resembling a miniature of Malcolm Campbell's Bluebird. He added a high pressure Rootes supercharger to the 747cc engine, boosting compression to the point of it requiring 32 studs to anchor the cylinder head. The car ran at the Montlehery and Southport speed trials but did not meet expectation and a decision was made to turn it into a track racer.

The engine and transmission were retained and clothed in a frame and body similar to American Sprint race cars. The lightweight car weighed only 431kg (8.5 cwt). To lower the driving position the transmission was offset. On its debut at the 1934 Brooklands Whitsun meeting and driven by factory driver Driscoll the car took the lap record in the Mountain handicap. Two new cars were built to the same design for 1935. One was destroyed in 1937 at Brooklands in a crash that effectively ended the racing career of ladies champion Kay Petre. Both cars had proved extremely successful on the track at Brooklands and Donington and in hillclimbs such as Shelsey Walsh.
"

Three of these works racers exist - Gaydon's 1935 side-valve (this blue one) and 2 green 1936 twin-cams - one also at Gaydon (livery with #10) and the other owned by Chateau Impney.

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