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2013 Dacia Dokker Express [F67]

2013 Dacia Dokker Express [F67] in Side om Side, TV Series, 2013-2018 IMDB Ep. 5.01

Class: Cars, Van / MPV — Model origin: RO — Built in: MA — Made for: D

2013 Dacia Dokker Express [F67]

[*] Background vehicle

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

Lateef NO

2017-08-27 00:29

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[Image: dok1.jpg]

Lateef NO

2017-08-27 00:30

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Very rare in Norway, and AFAIK not officially sold - only imported through Germany and Sweden via third-party dealers.

AleX_DJ AT

2017-11-01 22:45

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I gave a look to the site of Dacia Norway: is the Duster the only model officially sold?

Lateef NO

2017-11-01 22:59

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Yes, with very poor sales. I can count on one hand how many I've spotted. When looking for a new car in 2014, I suggested to my family we take look at the Duster - we eventually settled on a Yeti instead. We found that the rear seats for the Duster were rather uncomfortable and cheap. We're very satisfied with the Yeti.

AleX_DJ AT

2017-11-01 23:45

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That's curious, in the rest of Europe it sells quite well, as like the Sandero does (but it's not uncommon also to see several of the other models, at least here around).

In 2014 I had an almost identical experience as yours: my family too decided to buy a new car to replace our old CitroŽn C8 and I proposed to take a look (together with some other models) to the Duster. We had the same impressions you had, although we knew that for its price it was anyway appreciable. We bought then a CitroŽn C4 Aircross: this is really a quite uncommon sight here around, but it's really a nice looking car. Unfortunately the interior is not much roomy and the Mitsubishi-sourced diesel engine showed to be often not much efficient on high mountain roads (so that we often preferred to use my CitroŽn C3 for mountain trips). For these reasons we recently switched to a Land Rover Discovery Sport, with which we are really satisfied.

Lateef NO

2017-11-02 12:44

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I think the reason for the poor sales is because most Norwegians prefer more expensive cars from "trusted" manufacturers. Dacia is viewed as an "Eastern Bloc" make, and as such the reputation takes some time to develop. Skoda had a poor reputation back in the 90s - "hvorfor kjÝre Skoda, nŚr du kan gŚ da?" (why drive a Skoda when you can walk), but is now one of the top makes here.

Many years ago, from the 1950s to the 1980s, Eastern European cars experienced massive sales in Norway. Prior to October 1960 there were car rationing laws in force, meaning that you would have to document a very good excuse/reason to own a private car. Essentially, you couldn't buy a car until you had obtained a purchase permission from the government despite having the money for it (and cars were very expensive back in the 50s). Cars from the Eastern Bloc, however, were exempt from both the car rationing laws, as well as the VAT and import taxations, making them readily obtainable. They were well suited for the rough and unfinished infrastructure and cold winters of Norway meaning that they achieved superb sales back in the 50s. This was possible due to a trade deal with the USSR.

As the car rationing was abolished in 1960, Eastern Bloc cars experienced more competition, but essentially they were the cheapest cars on the market and continued to be viewed that way. However, once the first Japanese cars arrived on the market in the mid-60s, they were severely challenged. While Japanese cars struggled with poor build quality reputation during the first years, Eastern European cars struggled with reputation related to their obsolete technology and reliability issues.

Ladas and Skodas continued to be sold in great numbers during the 70s-80s - as they were cheap and seen as ugly and primitive DIY cars that however appealed to those who were handy and able to fix their own cars. Japanese cars were seen as inexpensive and reliable cars with technology on par with their European competitors. In the 90s, however, Eastern European cars were the butt of most jokes you could think of: "LADA - Laget Av Dumme Aper" (LADA - Made By Stupid Monkeys) and "LADA GT - GulvTeppe" (Floor Carpeting). Lada finally pulled out of the Norwegian market in 1998, and Skoda spent several years under VW leadership convincing Norwegians that the old, unreliable and outdated Skoda was no more.

Gag Halfrunt UK

2017-11-02 14:00

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@Lateef: That reminds me of this American TV movie set in the USSR but filmed in Norway with many recognisable Oslo locations passed off as Msocow. :)
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-- Last edit: 2017-11-02 14:06:19

Lateef NO

2017-11-02 14:15

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Indeed :D in addition to the available cars and similar cold climate, Norway was very socialistic back in the 50s and 60s and this can be seen in much of the architecture from that time. So Norway doubling for USSR back then may not sound as crazy as it would have been today.

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