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1950 Morris Cowley ½-Ton Pickup with converted rear bed [MO]

1950 Morris Cowley ½-Ton Pickup [MO] in Benoît Brisefer: Les taxis rouges, Movie, 2014 IMDB

Class: Cars, Pick-up — Model origin: UK

1950 Morris Cowley ½-Ton Pickup with converted rear bed [MO]

[*] Background vehicle

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

chicomarx BE

2016-02-27 01:19

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LVCDC wrote [Image: bbltr_2016-02-26-1h07m.jpg]

electra225 IT

2016-02-27 14:06

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Morris ?

johnfromstaffs EN

2016-02-27 15:00

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/vehicle_756921-Morris-Cowley-1-2-Ton-Pickup-MO-1950.html

The conundrum is, may be a cut down half ton van.

eLMeR FM

2016-02-28 10:09

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The 1950-56 model was apparently simply called Morris Cowley MCV, according to Wikipedia, without ½-ton (shouldn't it be 10cwt, by the way, as British origin model?) nor any other complement.
This simple name is also used by the 6/80 & MO Club and by some other sites (simoncars.co.uk, morriswolseley.se - sv...). Shouldn't we use it also?

For the record, this one is not necessarily a "converted rear bed", as
6/80 & MO Club wrote The same lower body and floor support pressings are used for both van and pick-up bodies, which are quite detachable, as they bolt onto the chassis and rear of the cab.
[...]
Of these [surviving trucks recorded by our club], 6% are chassis cabs, and in a reversal of production numbers, 20% are vans, and 72% are trucks, with a few record types still 'unknown'. The high survival rate for trucks (Utes) is due to the large numbers exported to Australia [...]

and
morriswolseley.se wrote I oktober 1956, [...] hade man tillverkat ca 44100 MCV med följande fördelning (In October 1956, circa 44,100 MCV had been made, divided up as follows) (1):
Vans = 30100 (69 %)
Trucks = 10600 (25 %)
Chassis cabs = 2600 (6 %)

_____

1: As usual, Traduttore, traditore. I don't speak svenska, so this is just a 2nd level translation (my translation tool → my translation into English). Feel free to correct it :)

johnfromstaffs EN

2016-02-28 12:12

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Should it be called 10cwt?

No. Clear evidence that Morris Motors called it half ton, and also, apparently, Cowley, although that may be only in foreign sales.
Scroll down for images of parts list, shop manual etc.

http://orchardclassics.co.uk/MORRISVAN.html

Admins, any comments to make?

-- Last edit: 2016-02-28 12:39:02

dsl SX

2016-02-28 17:01

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I don't have strong thoughts to contribute, but some passing thoughts:

- as I understand it Morris used ton-fractions (eg ½-Ton) in preference to X-cwt because it was more meaningful when clear fractions emerged, so although 10cwt = ½-Ton, it was a weaker title. But when clear fractions were not possible, they used X-cwt eg first Minor vans (O-series) were ¼-Ton (=5cwt) but later upgrade allowed 6 cwt which was preferred to cumbersome fraction equivalent (three-tenths of a ton). Plus Ton titles would have been more recognisable than cwt for non-English speaking export markets.
- I think jfs link seems to prove we're correct in how we enter these - particularly the publications titles - but seems there are parallel names in use as elmer's links. Unclear if these are official or common usage, or even if Morris changed their official title during the model's life. Was for instance MCV an early temporary or transitional hangover from when Morris stopped being Morris-Commercial??
- also slightly surprising that Cowley was used in the official name because there was never a Cowley [MO] saloon - just Oxfords. Seems odd decision for Morris to choose a separate title for MO commercials (although a revival of pre-war poverty title). Maybe they felt that Oxford should never be used for commercials, while there had been Cowley vans in the 1920s so was OK.

Sunbar UK

2016-02-28 17:28

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johnfromstaffs wrote ...

Clear evidence that Morris Motors called it half ton, and also, apparently, Cowley, although that may be only in foreign sales.
....

Admins, any comments to make?


Nothing definite, still looking for UK advertisements, but I agree that 'Morris Half Ton Van' (or Pick-up plus a chassis only) was used primarily.

Also not all export sales included 'Cowley' in the name apparently...
Morris Half Ton Van and Pick-up, Morris Bestelwagens & Pick-Up Trucks 1953 Netherlands brochure

johnfromstaffs EN

2016-02-28 17:52

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During one of my father's "hair shirt" (see Maurice Wiggin) periods, the quite new Cowley saloon was sold to assist with house purchase.

Attracted by an advertisement from a Walsall car patch for a "Morris Cowley Estate car" we went to take a look. It turned out to be a well used half ton van with windows fitted to the sides behind the front seats, we already had a Ford 7cwt deluxe van anyway, so no sale. This was about 1959, so the side valve half ton van was known then as a Cowley, at least in Walsall.

Morris did not stop being Morris-Commercial until after the side valve half ton. The Morris make was used for vans etc up to half ton, then from 1 ton onwards they were called Morris-Commercial.

-- Last edit: 2016-02-28 18:00:22

Sunbar UK

2016-02-28 19:17

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Except that 'Morris-Commercial' J type half-ton vans and 'Morris' half-ton vans (based on Morris car chassis) appear to have been sold in direct competition to each other. The 'Morris' half-ton vans were not advertised as being from the same Morris-Commercial range so presumably were at least sometimes sold from different dealer locations.

The 'Cowley' name for the van was prominent on the May 1950 'CM' Morris Van Road Test, so it may have have been used initially by Morris in development. Although it is never easy to say if that was consistently used by Morris Motors or if it was dropped before it was sold in volume.

-- Last edit: 2016-02-28 19:17:47

johnfromstaffs EN

2016-02-28 19:47

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You have justified the name change by the use of the phrase "based on Morris car chassis".

While my Dad might have considered a converted half ton, which could be coaxed up to about 55mph, there is no way he would have looked at a J-type.

eLMeR FM

2016-02-29 01:19

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I understand the Half-Ton name instead of MCV, but why has it the with converted rear bed complement? Isn't the model in the screenshots just a factory "truck"/pickup or a chassis-cab version?
[Image: morrishalf-tonvan.jpg]

-- Last edit: 2016-02-29 01:26:34

Sunbar UK

2016-02-29 11:33

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The rear bed is wrong for some reason.

The fuel filler is outside of the rear wing form which itself is too small.

It would have started life as a chassis-cab version with a different body or converted van or a badly restored pick-up.

[Image: morrispickup.jpg]

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