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1945 White WA 20 Super Power

1945 White WA 20 in White Heat, Movie, 1949 IMDB

Class: Trucks, Trailer truck (tractor) — Model origin: US

1945 White WA 20 Super Power

[*][*][*][*] Vehicle used a lot by a main character or for a long time

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

Firebird86 US

2006-11-26 17:39

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1945 White WA-20 link

antp BE

2007-05-06 12:10

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Pictures sent by Roland:

[Image: pdvd000wf5.4067.jpg] [Image: pdvd003kv8.4109.jpg] [Image: pdvd006xe8.7237.jpg] [Image: pdvd008ma6.747.jpg] [Image: pdvd010hp7.7724.jpg]

fleetwood75

2011-11-02 03:53

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Did White build their own gas engines for a while? Or did they purchase engines from companies like Buda and Continental and rebadge them as White engines? Would greatly appreciate finding the answer to this?

vilero ES

2012-03-01 14:04

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[Image: WhiteHeat45.jpg] [Image: WhiteHeat55.jpg] [Image: WhiteHeat49.jpg] [Image: WhiteHeat62.jpg]

SN95 US

2013-03-09 16:45

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Two characters discuss dragging a chain from the trailer to prevent the buildup of static electricity. I don't believe I have ever seen that in real life. What do modern tankers do to control static electricity?

truckface NO

2013-12-11 11:15

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Incredible! It`s the same type of tanker trailer, used in the 1971 movie "Duel".

-- Last edit: 2013-12-11 11:16:33

cycolac fan EN

2015-12-16 17:59

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I've seen cars in the 1970s and 80s in the Uk with lines dragging from the back bumper to supposedly cure motion sickness, would think a chain if anything would cause sparks although maybe not a problem since the tanker is empty.

If the truck was owned by the studio then it's possible it WAS one of the tankers used in Duel, especially when they shot extra scenes for the cinema release. This one has jockey wheels allowing it to be removed from the cab unit while the trucks used in Duel didn't, but they would be easy enough to remove.

Pierre EN

2016-05-21 23:17

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Certainly, having a length of loo handle chain dangling from the underside rear supposedly to earth static electricity, was quite popular in the 1950s. I remember Father experimented with this motion sickness placebo measure for a short while, removing it from the Minor after one or two other road users helpfully asked: 'Do you know, there's a little chain hanging down underneath your car?'
The Peterbilt prime mover, at least, in 'Duel' is well documented on imcdb.

chicomarx BE

2017-02-18 03:37

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Pierre wrote Certainly, having a length of loo handle chain dangling from the underside rear supposedly to earth static electricity, was quite popular in the 1950s. I remember Father experimented with this motion sickness placebo measure for a short while, removing it from the Minor after one or two other road users helpfully asked: 'Do you know, there's a little chain hanging down underneath your car?'

Not a loo chain but this sort of thing I used to see quite regularly:
[Image: car_static_strip.jpg]
until 10-15 years ago, and then they disappeared.

johnfromStaffs EN

2017-02-18 17:10

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What do modern tankers do to control static electricity?

Modern tyres have a higher proportion of carbon in the rubber which improves its conductivity. Some years ago I was involved in the manufacture of some armoured personnel carriers for which the customer required to have electrified hulls, to prevent people climbing on the vehicles during riots. His previous vehicles, built early sixties, had to have a chain lowered from the hull to earth away the charge when the system was switched off after use. The system wouldn't work on the new vehicles because the charge leaked away through the tyres, so we had to design a rail, stood away from the hull on insulators, to which the charge would be applied when entering riot conditions. It worked OK but the rails could be broken away from the vehicles using an insulated pole.

The charge was created using a modified ignition coil, generating some 20,000 volts, albeit at a very low current. You wouldn't hold on for long! By the way, the vehicles were diesel powered so sparks wouldn't be a problem.

-- Last edit: 2017-02-18 17:15:14

rjluna2 US

2017-02-18 18:12

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SN95 wrote Two characters discuss dragging a chain from the trailer to prevent the buildup of static electricity. I don't believe I have ever seen that in real life. What do modern tankers do to control static electricity?

They still do that to the day with these tankers, now they are using the conductive strip that needed to replace after they wear out.

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