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2001 Berkhof Jonckheer Volvo B7LA

2001 Berkhof Jonckheer in Plan C, Movie, 2012 IMDB

Class: Bus, Articulated bus — Model origin: SE — Built in: NL

2001 Berkhof Jonckheer Volvo B7LA

[*] Background vehicle

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

Weasel1984 PL

2012-07-31 16:27

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In fact it was Berkhof "Jonckheer" without "e" at the end. This indeed can be a bit confusing, as name is nearly identical with the Belgian "Jonckheere", which together with the Berkhof Heerenveen was part of the Berkhof Jonckheere Group.

-- Last edit: 2012-07-31 16:29:02

blinski PL

2012-08-01 00:54

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Trivia I found on Dutch wikipedia (translated by google, edited by me):
'The name Jonckheer is often confused with the Belgian manufacturer's name Jonckheere. As a result it's often speculated that this type of model is co-produced by Belgian manufacturer. This is not the case, since the manufacturer name Jonckheere has an extra 'e' in spelling. It is simply a naming relating to the then Director CFP Jonckheer Testa.'
My adding: brand name Jonckheere (with an extra 'e') relate to Henri Jonckheere, XIX-century Belgian horse drawn carriages builder.

Weasel1984 PL

2012-08-01 20:46

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Interesting "supplement"!

antp BE

2012-08-02 17:36

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Indeed, nice info :)

blinski PL

2012-08-02 18:31

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Antp, I'm not sure if you're Dutch native speaker (I know most people in Brussels are French speakers), but im interested in linguistic aspects and I got a question. I wonder if similarity of these two names (Jonckheer and Jonckheere) is a matter of the same process of dropping 'e' throughtout time as in English? You know, all this old-English 'wilde' and 'shoppe':)

chicomarx BE

2012-08-02 20:05

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I've yet to see him write a word of Dutch. :D It's a difference between old Flemish and the Dutch in Holland. West-Flemish adds the -e for feminine words. (that may have been the case in old English too??) It was spoken in the northeastern United States but now extinct, and nearly gone in Flanders too since only modern Dutch is taught.

ingo DE

2012-08-02 21:06

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blinski wrote Antp, I'm not sure if you're Dutch native speaker

No, he's Wallonian.

chicomarx BE

2012-08-02 22:31

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Way off. Brussels-Capital is a region independent from Wallonia with its own government.

Sandie SX

2012-08-02 22:34

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So would that make him a Sprout? [Image: 1841212407.gif]

I understand that speaking French in the wrong part of Belgium gets you a punched face. When I went I limited my incitement of the locals to wearing an Anderlecht scarf in Bruges.

blinski PL

2012-08-02 22:34

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Thank you for comprehensive answer, chicomarx!:)

chicomarx BE

2012-08-02 22:45

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@Sandie That's not very limited, that was more provocative than speaking French. :wow: I'm not a Flemish nationalist, I don't care if anyone speaks French here.

ingo DE

2012-08-02 22:54

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Sandie's example with the football scarf doesn't really fit. It's not a matter of the language, the distinction is much narrower. It depends on towns, sometimes even boroughs.
So as here in the Ruhr Area. Foreign football-fans have to be very careful, where they sing and show what.

ingo DE

2012-08-02 22:57

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A Dutch friend told me, that when I try to use my (very poor) French in France, I always have to ask for "Kah soixante-dix" spare parts or literature. When you say "Kah septante", the prices will be higher or the stuff not available ay more.

chicomarx BE

2012-08-02 23:07

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:D 'septante/nonante' is used in Belgium. If you were to say that in Paris they'll pretend not to understand at all.

antp BE

2012-08-03 22:04

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In Switzerland they use it too ;)

chicomarx wrote Way off. Brussels-Capital is a region independent from Wallonia with its own government.

Yes, thanks :D I'm from Brussels, not from Wallonia :o
I speak a little Dutch, but badly (I probably posted once or two in Dutch on the site, though)

Here is a very good explanation of all that complicated stuff in Belgian regions/communities
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ceg6NQKHd70
There is just one (big) mistake: when they mention the three regions they used the flags of the three linguistic communities
i.e. they used Link to "upload.wikimedia.org" (German-speaking community) instead of Link to "upload.wikimedia.org" (Brussels region)

-- Last edit: 2012-08-03 22:08:31

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