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1936 Mercedes-Benz 170 V [W136]

1936 Mercedes-Benz 170 V [W136] in Osvobozhdenie, Mini-Series, 1969-1972 IMDB Ep. 3

Class: Cars, Sedan — Model origin: DE

1936 Mercedes-Benz 170 V [W136]

[*] Background vehicle

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

johnfromstaffs EN

2008-06-29 19:41

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Looks like a 1936 to 1940 Model 170V.

Ingo DE

2008-06-29 19:50

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Where was this scene shot? The windows of the house in the back don't look Russian, more Polish, resp.German-pre-1945-style.

chris40 UK

2008-06-29 20:12

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@john: I'd agree with that.
@Ingo: The Cyrillic says 'Berlin: 14.40 hours'; maybe it really was ... IMDB doesn't give locations. (It might be Poland or Byelorussia, of course.)

Weasel1984 PL

2008-06-29 20:17

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Why Byelorussia? :D
Well I think many scenes were filmed in East Germany and for sure some also in Poland (Warsaw) /vehicle_179118-unknown.html .
I'can't recognize this location, it can be a real Berlin (East Berlin).

-- Last edit: 2008-06-29 20:23:20

Ingo DE

2008-06-29 20:38

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I don't think, it's East-Berlin. It's not Berlin-area style, it's more typical for the former German Pommern (Pomorze) or Schlesien (Silesia) or Ostpreussen (polish name of it?? ). It's quite sure East or the river Oder (Odra).

chris40 UK

2008-06-29 22:22

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@Ingo: East Prussia=Ostpreussen=Prusy Wschodnie. (BTW Silesia=Schlesien=Śląsk.) You could be right; I've never been to Berlin or Lower Silesia.
@Michał: Why not? Before the war much of what is now Belarus' was in Poland, wasn't it? :/

Weasel1984 PL

2008-06-29 22:47

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Indeed that's a translated to Polish name ("Prusy Wschodnie"), but isn't in use anymore, this region is known as "Warmia i Mazury". The part of former "Ostpreussen" is since end of the war also in Soviet Union (today Russia) - "Kaliningradskaya oblast".
About the Belarus, that's true, but it was the same with some parts of today's western Ukraine (for example the Ukrainian Lviv before the war was known as Lwów and was the second most important city in Poland, even more important than Kraków) http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grafika:RzeczpospolitaII.png

Ingo DE

2008-06-29 22:57

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One interesting detail: the border between the Russian and the Polish parts of the former Ostpreussen is the only border in Europe, which was made straight with a ruler. In all other continents it's usual.

@Weasel: in 2003 I've been to the Elbing/Elblag and Danzig/Gdansk-region on search, where my father's familiy was coming from in Jan.1945. The actual travel-guide, a German translation of a Polish book, had irritated me, because the Polish "rayons" are mostly different to the former German "Landkreise" and even regions. To find out the old places, I needed a copy of a pre-war German plan.

Ingo DE

2008-06-29 23:06

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P.S.In German times "Ostpreussen and "Westpreussen" were something different, Danzig even annother country since 1919. The border of the "Polish Korridor" was going along the river Nogat, in front of the Marienburg/Malbork. My grand-grand-father was a customs-officer at that place.

Gag Halfrunt UK

2008-06-29 23:31

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The street name sign appears to be written entirely in upper case. Berlin signs (including DDR-vintage ones in former East Berlin) are always in mixed case, e.g. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:PankeStra%C3%9FeNatur.JPG

Weasel1984 PL

2008-06-30 00:18

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Ingo wrote ...The actual travel-guide, a German translation of a Polish book, had irritated me, because the Polish "rayons" are mostly different to the former German "Landkreise" and even regions. To find out the old places, I needed a copy of a pre-war German plan.

Well as I believe searches can be also difficult, as most of these places simply "disappeared from the face of the earth" at the end of the WWII. Gdańsk or Wrocław were destroyed in 60%-70%, luckily have been quickly rebuilt after the war (anyway a bigger part of them). Elbląg old-town was less lucky and this what stays there today dates back to the 1980's.

Ingo DE

2008-06-30 21:16

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@weasel: yes, to orientate in towns or bigger villages was not the problem for me, I know their German and Polish names, but there is no detailed, actual map with both names for small villages.

Yes Elbing/Elblag was heavily destroyed, in the old town center just they've survived 1945: http://www.23hq.com/fotovolker/photo/2596154
But my father's birthplace is still existing. The houses in the Al.Grundwaldzka (Tannenbergallee until 1945) were not too bad destroyed. the house is easy to find: just opposite of the McDonalds and the ESSO-station. :)

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