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1946 Guy Wolf

1946 Guy Wolf in The Ipcress File, Movie, 1965 IMDB

Class: Trucks, Simple truck — Model origin: UK

1946 Guy Wolf

Position 00:25:50 [*] Background vehicle

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

Alexander DE

2005-12-14 14:33

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Looks like a Guy.
This is a rather rare view, as all the Guy lorries were of the COE type. I assume that this lorry uses a bus chassis, probably a Guy Wolf, which is lower, to get more space for bulky goods.

antp BE

2005-12-14 14:35

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Quote Looks like a Guy.


I confirm: on that picture the character does not seem to be a woman :D

I know, it was an easy joke :o

Alexander DE

2005-12-14 14:37

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:D

Jaqob P. NL

2006-01-07 22:03

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:) :D

hiergehts CH

2006-01-12 07:37

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Guy wearing glasses..? :D

Jaqob P. NL

2006-01-12 18:17

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It's got foglamps, so it looks like glasses (the lorrie I mean)

sixcyl FR

2006-02-11 08:46

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..a nice Guy anyway ... :D

stronghold EN

2007-08-06 13:16

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[Image: ipcress18xh9.2391.jpg]

johnfromstaffs EN

2008-03-26 21:29

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Apart from the jokes about Guys, the above information is not strictly correct. The Guy Wolf was a truck chassis and was available throughout its life as both normal control (bonneted) and forward control (cab over engine). The vehicle in the picture is a bonneted Wolf, the chassis of which could be bought both as a truck and as a bus. Since Guy vehicles were substantially hand built it would be possible to specify special to type build requirements, such as different spring and damper rates to make the ride more comfortable in a passenger carrying application.

The Guy Arab was, however intended as a bus only, and was the only double deck chassis available for the duration of the second world war. It was fairly unrefined, but extremely durable and reliable.

Alexander DE

2008-03-26 21:37

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Thanks for the info, John.

I found a picture showing a rare bonneted Guy Wolf truck:
http://ccmv.fotopic.net/p26610967.html

johnfromstaffs EN

2008-03-27 20:29

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Thanks for your kind comment. That is a superb picture, and as you say, there weren't many built new, so there must be even fewer in preservation. The road is in leafy Sussex by the look of it. As a final point, the red indian chief above the radiator is the Guy trade mark, not an aftermarket addition, and carries the motto "Feathers in our Cap".

Alexander DE

2008-03-29 18:44

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John, I guess you will like this link:
http://www.localhistory.scit.wlv.ac.uk/Museum/Transport/commercial/Guy/guylorrypics.htm

johnfromstaffs EN

2008-03-31 11:39

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Thank you for this. As you can see from my nickname I am from Staffordshire and grew up in the countryside about 16 miles from the Guy factory. My father liked his cars and we had many thirties models when my twin brother and I were small. My favourite was a 1940 Citroen Traction Avant Onze Legere, built in the English factory at Slough. My own first car was a 1954 Ford Popular and in the last 43 years there have been too many more to make a list here.

As preparation for my retirement I bought an Audi A4 Avant 2.0 TDI which is performing well, and my 1953 Bentley still awaits work, which I estimate at about five more years.

Oldsmobile1897 US

2015-08-01 07:31

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Hey, Sunbar maybe you can pinpoint what year is this lorry from? :hello:

johnfromStaffs EN

2015-08-01 08:54

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http://www.historywebsite.co.uk/Museum/Transport/commercial/Guy/Wolf.htm

Oldsmobile1897 US

2015-08-03 20:46

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Looking at the catalogue cover that johnfromStaffs provided, this particular lorry is a ‘38-‘39 model?

johnfromstaffs EN

2015-08-03 22:10

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Possibly, but the hand built nature of these vehicles meant that similar designs would last for years. I cannot recall seeing a bonneted Wolf truck in service, but have one or two pictures all pre WW2. I used to see a cab over Wolf on my way to work in the late 1960s, delivering sacks of coal. It must have been 20 plus years old even then.

Sunbar UK

2016-06-15 17:00

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1946 Guy Wolf (post war radiator).

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