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1972 Chrysler 180 [949]

1972 Chrysler 180 [949] in Tout le monde il est beau, tout le monde il est gentil, Movie, 1972 IMDB

Class: Cars, Sedan — Model origin: FR

1972 Chrysler 180 [949]

[*][*][*][*] Vehicle used a lot by a main character or for a long time

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

sixcyl FR

2007-12-07 23:17

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[Image: chrysler180abyq9.7411.jpg] [Image: chrysler180adnm9.th.jpg] [Image: chrysler180aefy2.th.jpg] [Image: chrysler180agis7.1817.jpg]
[Image: chrysler180aibu8.851.jpg]
[Image: chrysler180acee2.th.jpg]
A pure beauty of plastic ... :D

rpcm PT

2007-12-08 00:41

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It's a 1972 model year 180 ( introduced September 1971 ). One of the recognizable details is the absence of the C-pillar grille of the first cars.

Bravada PL

2007-12-08 23:02

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What's a "C-pillar grille"?

wickey SK

2007-12-08 23:08

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thing this car has on C-Pillar

http://www.simcatalbotclub.org/scar9.jpg

Bravada PL

2007-12-08 23:08

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Oh, the vent!

wickey SK

2007-12-08 23:10

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;)

Ingo DE

2007-12-08 23:10

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The German word is "C-Säule", the part between the back side-window and the back window, which hold the roof. some cars have a grill of the air-outtake there, sone only a "look-a-like"-grille.


Ask a K 70-freak about C-pillar-grilles and you will get the needed informations :sun:

Ingo DE

2007-12-08 23:17

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Oops, my third double-posting this evening. Now wickey: :beer:

I just thought to say, that I really got a beer from your country, but this is not correct any more since 1992. It's a Krusovice (after two Budweiser Pilsener) ;)


@Bravada: o.k., let's drop the 2 minutes difference: :beer: (for you an EB, from the birth-town of my father) :)

rpcm PT

2007-12-08 23:50

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The question about the C-pillar grille is answered but I take the opportunity to refer the 70s "kitsch" of the dashboard with the period Philips radio, all looking so new ( but not for long ).

Ingo DE

2007-12-09 00:03

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@rpcm: do you have used the word "kitsch" in the German meaning?

Then I must say -as a K 70-freak- that not all 70ies-cars had such dash-boards.

Ingo DE

2007-12-09 00:07

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And the most German cars had no Philips-radios. If yes, only as aftersales-market-extras. The radios, offered for new cars, were Blaupunkt, Grundig or Becker.
Blaupunkt-radios for Volswagen and Audi had even special names, different to the Blaupunkt-radios for other cars.

This was typical for Germany, in a lot of export-countries these "orignal" radios weren't available. For example in Sweden or Italy.

-- Last edit: 2007-12-09 00:07:54

Bravada PL

2007-12-09 00:07

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Rpcm: I believe the 180s dashboard is just tacky, but not kitschy.

Ingo: I don't drink beer, but was your father born in Elbing actually?

rpcm PT

2007-12-09 00:24

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I used "kitsch" due to the use of all that fake wood ( Formica, I suppose ) that seems pretentious since it only gives a supperficial effect, without any quality. That was common in many interiors at the time but, of course, there were exceptions.
When I mentioned the radio, I wasn't being pejorative; it's just another period item, something that adds more feeling and contextualises better this 70s interior.

Ingo DE

2007-12-09 00:33

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Bravada wrote Ingo: I don't drink beer, but was your father born in Elbing actually?
#

Yes, in 1942. I have a scrapped a piece of the plaster of the house, he was born in, to put it in the glass cupboard, where we put our travelling-souvenirs, when I made a vacation-trip to Poland in 2003. I'm not revanchistic, I just wanted to see, where my father's family was coming from.
I was born 25 years after the war and after my family fleeded, so I cannot have ressentiments to other nationalities. I was always interested in history, so my feelings were a bit strange, when I was standing at some places (for example in Gdynia/Gdingen or when I crossed the river Wisla/Weichsel on the E 77).

I must say, that my family has something in common (but only this one) with Mrs Erika Steinbach, the most unpopular living German in Poland - they have been on the same ship at the 30.1.1945.

Ingo DE

2007-12-09 00:35

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rpcm wrote I used "kitsch" due to the use of all that fake wood ( Formica, I suppose ) that seems pretentious since it only gives a supperficial effect, without any quality. That was common in many interiors at the time but, of course, there were exceptions.
When I mentioned the radio, I wasn't being pejorative; it's just another period item, something that adds more feeling and contextualises better this 70s interior.


I know, what you mean. In my opinion very good examples for that are the Ford-cars of that years, also British cars and the Japanese (which were very rare in Europe).

Ingo DE

2007-12-09 00:40

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rpcm wrote When I mentioned the radio, I wasn't being pejorative


In relation to Philips-radios (or Motorola or some others), it's not pejorative, it's a fact. That design was disgusting indeed (the quality often, too).

I've found a Philips-radio in my K 70, too (bought in San Remo in 1998). Even it was originally mounted by the VW-importer in 1973, I've changed it to a Blaupunkt from that years. Just because, the design was so ugly.

rpcm PT

2007-12-09 00:52

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For me it's difficult to criticize old radios that way. I cannot classify this design as "disgusting", it's simple and perfectly according to what was being done in period. You can't forget it's a "bread and butter" article and, of course, doesn't have the "aplomb" of a Becker.
About your car, if it had a Voxson or an Autovox, I wouldn't suggest to change it. Your car must have the indicator repeater and it had a square rear numberplate. All typical Italian-spec items that gave it a specific feeling.

-- Last edit: 2007-12-09 01:00:19

Bravada PL

2007-12-09 00:55

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Quote I was born 25 years after the war and after my family fleeded, so I cannot have ressentiments to other nationalities. I was always interested in history, so my feelings were a bit strange, when I was standing at some places (for example in Gdynia/Gdingen or when I crossed the river Wisla/Weichsel on the E 77).


What was your father doing in Gdynia? It is actually quite funny to hear that there is a German name for a city that didn't exist until 1920s (though I guess it might have been applied to the village during the time it belonged to Prussia). Do come to Poland more often - history aside, it is a beautiful and fascinating country (did you get to experience the Elbląg Canal, for one?). I actually feel the same way about Germany and Germans.

Gag Halfrunt UK

2007-12-09 00:55

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@Ingo and Bravada:
I know (only on the Internet) a Polish-American whose family is from Elbląg/Elbing.

(I didn't know Elbing was the German name for Elbląg. I looked it up on Wikipedia. :))

Ingo DE

2007-12-09 13:47

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rpcm wrote For me it's difficult to criticize old radios that way. I cannot classify this design as "disgusting", it's simple and perfectly according to what was being done in period. You can't forget it's a "bread and butter" article and, of course, doesn't have the "aplomb" of a Becker.
About your car, if it had a Voxson or an Autovox, I wouldn't suggest to change it. Your car must have the indicator repeater and it had a square rear numberplate. All typical Italian-spec items that gave it a specific feeling.


Sorry, I never heard the names "Voxson" or "Autovox" and I never have seen them.
Yes, my car has the small turn-signals on the fender and also the white front indicators. But for German law I had to mount orange bulbs. Orange glasses were possible, too, but this would have destroyed the "Italian style". I even let the original tax-papers in the holder on the front-screen.
Also the hazard-light was blocked (Italian law in the 70ies, I don't know the reason). It was an ugly work to re-install it, because it's a duty in Germany.


-- Last edit: 2007-12-09 13:47:48

Ingo DE

2007-12-09 14:04

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Bravada wrote

What was your father doing in Gdynia? It is actually quite funny to hear that there is a German name for a city that didn't exist until 1920s (though I guess it might have been applied to the village during the time it belonged to Prussia). Do come to Poland more often - history aside, it is a beautiful and fascinating country (did you get to experience the Elbląg Canal, for one?). I actually feel the same way about Germany and Germans.


My family was on the ship, which was following that one: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilhelm_Gustloff_%28Schiff%29

When I'd parked in front of Marienburg/Malbork I was also thinking "Hmm, exactly here my grand-grandfather was working between 1920 and 1939 as a customs-officer at the border-point".
I'm sure, that people from countries ouside of Middle Europe (especially Germany and Poland) have no idea, how often the boderlines have changed in the last centuries.

Why is "Gdingen" an unusual name? I don't say "Gotenhafen".

I' really interested to travel more to Poland. My wife is not very interested, but I would also go to Breslau/Wroclaw, where her mother's family had lived until 1945.

Bravada PL

2007-12-09 15:18

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Quote My family was on the ship, which was following that one: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilhelm_Gustloff_%28Schiff%29


Oh my, would you believe I've never heard of it? There are still so many white spots...

As concerns Gdingen, it's just that I am thinking of Gdynia as of a place that only came to life in 1920s - I do realize there was a village there and it had to have a German name, but still I find it somehow funny (like the fact that Ian Fleming made Bloefeld born in Gdynia in 1908 or so, many years before the city was founded ;) ).

PS. Now I read Gdingen was a popular "Kurort" (interestingly enough, this word is a direct loanword from German to Polish). I've considered Gdynia my second home town and didn't know that... Shame on me...

I believe borders have been moving accross Europe, states were formed and fell apart - but I guess the Polish-German (and to some extent, Russian, Ukrainian and Belarussian) recent history is one of the few cases where such a huge land mass and number of people were involved in the moving actual states few hundred kilometres.

Wrocław is a very good example - almost all of the German population of Breslau were expelled after WW2, while the city was settled by the population of former Polish Galician areas, mostly Lviv. In a way, the spirit of Lviv and Galicia lives a hundred miles away in Wrocław now, but what happened to the former spirit of Breslau then?

Ingo DE

2007-12-13 20:01

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Bravada wrote
Wrocław is a very good example - almost all of the German population of Breslau were expelled after WW2, while the city was settled by the population of former Polish Galician areas, mostly Lviv. In a way, the spirit of Lviv and Galicia lives a hundred miles away in Wrocław now, but what happened to the former spirit of Breslau then?


The spirit is gone. Where it shall have survived? The only old-style reminiscence of Schlesien (Silesia) are some butchers "Original schlesische Wustspezialitäten", where the old recipies have survived in traditional butcher-families.

But from the old Schlesien is more left than from the old Ostpreussen or Westpreussen, because there were more German speaking people left over after 1945/46.

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