[ Login ]

Advertising

Last completed movie pages

Zhizn vperedi; Mytar; Gyakuten Saiban; Wolf Creek; The Trip to Spain; Scottish Mussel; Tempo di villeggiatura; The Age of Adaline; Six of a Kind; Garasu no kamen; Ubit litsedeya; El taaib; Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines; Blond mu▀ man sein auf Capri; Mo gui tian shi; (more...)

1965 Bedford TK Marsden Pantechnicon

1965 Bedford TK in Withnail & I, Movie, 1987 IMDB

Class: Trucks, Simple truck — Model origin: UK

1965 Bedford TK Marsden Pantechnicon

Position 01:29:49 [*] Background vehicle

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

Sunbar UK

2007-10-04 19:42

Quote

Bedford TK body by Marsden similar to this.....

/vehicle_63378-Bedford-TK-1968.html

-- Last edit: 2007-10-04 19:46:02

G-MANN UK

2007-10-05 17:13

Quote

So that's what a pantechnicon looks like. That word has kind of faded from popular use, only some middle-aged people seem to use it now, to me it sounded like some kind of futuristic vehicle used by some draconian police force in a sci-fi story, silly name for a furniture van.

-- Last edit: 2007-10-05 17:15:37

Sunbar UK

2007-10-05 20:27

Quote

The Pantechnicon ("everything of the arts") was originally the name of a large building in London constructed to house a bazaar of all kinds of artistic work, I guess in Victorian times. Later the building was converted into a furniture warehouse. So a pantechnicon van was a furniture van even for horse-drawn vehicles, later just shortened to pantechnicon. Gradually used less I guess starting in the 1950s.

Alexander DE

2007-10-05 21:12

Quote

As I started using this word here, this really proves I must be from the middle ages ... [Image: keule.gif]

:D

Actually the word pantechnicon was first coined in 1830. In that year a bazaar was opened in Motcomb Street in the Belgravia area of London. It was a shop for all kinds of art and the proprietor used the Greek words pan (=all) and tekhnikon (=artistic; belonging to the arts). The enterprise didn't last very long and the building, which was said to be fire-proof, was thereafter used as a furniture repository. The horse-drawn vans that were used to transport furniture to and from the building were soon known as pantechnicon vans or short pantechnicon. This name was kept, even after the building burnt down in 1874.

G-MANN UK

2007-10-05 21:20

Quote

As long as that word is part of the vehicle name.

Add a comment

You must login to post comments...

Advertising