[ Login ]

Advertising

Last completed movie pages

Tatort - Du allein; Don Giovannino; Hollywood Shuffle; Le tardone; Tenki no ko; Kalle på Spången; Perfect Plan; Ji su feng yun; Antikiller 2: Antiterror; Can't Buy Me Love; Forever Lulu; Polizeifunk ruft; Starshina; Eto mi, Gospodi...; Ryabinovyy vals; (more...)

1971 Peugeot 504 Wagon

1971 Peugeot 504 Wagon in Shaker Run, Movie, 1985 IMDB

Class: Cars, Wagon — Model origin: FR — Made for: NZ

1971 Peugeot 504 Wagon

[*] Background vehicle

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

nzcarnerd NZ

2007-08-31 09:29

Quote

Note that the 504 is a 'break' (wagon) - quite rare here in NZ. Behind it is an HQ Holden, then a Daimler V8 250, behind that a Chrysler Valiant from 1971-2.

Raul1983 FI

2007-08-31 10:58

Quote

In this movie I noticed that New Zealand has indeed a very interesting and exceptional selection of vehicles in the streets. Old Japanese cars, Australian cars, odd European cars. Not many American cars though.

BeanBandit FI

2007-08-31 12:10

Quote

The domestic cars from Holden, Ford and Chrysler are pretty much like American cars, with V8 engines and rear wheel drive. Even more so now.
Actually can be said, the Ozzie cars feel more American than the (mostly) V6 front wheel drive modern Americans.

Ingo DE

2007-09-01 16:31

Quote

@Raul1983: at my visit in 1998 I've seen over there an unbelievable collection of cars from all around the world. The oldest ones (also the most on classic car meetings) were British, the never ones for ca.70% imported used cars from Japan. So because of this you also can see right-hand-drive Opel, Fuso trucks and so on. I've seen there GM cars made in Australia, USA, Argentina, England, Germany, South Africa and South Korea.

One day I was walking along the harbour of Auckland. It was empty. The next day the docks were full with imported used cars from Japan. This was also a reason, why all car-factorys in NZ were closed.

One day we made a trip across the Coromandel-peninsula. looking for the nature sights. Annother car comes from the other direction. After a few seconds I realized something, made a full braking, drove to the banket and turned with a slide on 180 degrees and drove with full speed into the other direction. My friend was shocked about that, I hadn't said any word.
"What are you doing?", he shouted.
"It was a RO 80!", I answered, while driving with over 100 km/h on the small road.
"Are you seeing ghosts? Why in hell there shall be a RO 80 in this part of the world?"
"It WAS a RO 80, you'll see"
After a few minutes chasing we got the car and the lady driving it.
It was a RO 80, indeed.


I must say, that my friend was a hardcore-RO 80-freak, and at our NZ-trip we had visited several NSU-freaks on the Northern Island.

Gag Halfrunt UK

2007-09-01 20:40

Quote

Quote In the 1980s, New Zealand eased import restrictions, and reduced import tariffs on cars. Consequently, large volumes of used cars from Japan appeared on the local market, at a time when most cars in New Zealand were locally assembled, and expensive compared to other countries, with most used cars available being comparatively old.

Local buyers now had a much wider choice of models, but despite specifications being higher than so-called "NZ New" cars, there were many problems with "clocking" or odometer fraud, with the odometer wound back to display a much lower mileage. Other problems include written-off vehicles involved in accidents in Japan.

However, the widespread availability of used Japanese imports prompted official importers to reduce the price of brand new cars, and in 1998, New Zealand became one of the few countries in the world to lift import tariffs on motor vehicles.

Nevertheless, sales of used imports, 94.6 per cent of which come from Japan.[4] remain higher than those of vehicles first registered in New Zealand. In 2006, 123,390 ex-overseas vehicles were registered, compared to 76,804 brand new vehicles. Although most of these are Japanese makes and models, a significant number are German makes, such as Audi, BMW, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche and Volkswagen, traditionally regarded as 'prestige' brands, of which 12519 were sold in New Zealand, accounting for 10 per cent. [5] There are a smaller number of US makes such as Chevrolet and Chrysler, which were built in right hand drive for the Japanese market.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grey_import#New_Zealand

Opels are sold in Japan, and I read somewhere that a lot of Japanese-market Vectras are exported secondhand to New Zealand, since they're the same as Holden Vectras sold new in NZ.

Ingo DE

2007-09-01 22:46

Quote

@Gag: yes, these Opels I've seen in NZ (mostly Kadett E GSI) were imported as used cars from Japan. Also German made cars over there where coming from Japan. O.k., a few ones were directly imported from Germany and sold as new cars, but their pricers were exorbitant, so some "Kiwi's", who want to have a German car, have bought used ones, imported from Japan. Except one Mercedes W 126 S-class all German cars I've seen, were right-hand-drive. Also the K 70 of a friend of mine in Auckland - but that car was running in Hongkong before going to NZ.

The US-made-cars, I've seen, were mostly left-hand-drive, so obviously privately imported.

-- Last edit: 2007-09-01 22:48:03

Gag Halfrunt UK

2007-09-03 00:51

Quote

Once or twice I've seen what I think must be Japanese-market Mercedes in London. They're right hand drive but have American-sized number plate recesses.

-- Last edit: 2007-09-19 00:04:22

Ingo DE

2007-09-03 17:34

Quote

As it's written in wikipedia, the export of used japanese cars to Ireland is quite popular. In 1999 I've seen in Ireland a plenty of cars, which were obviously running before in Japan. Really surprised I've been, whan I've found front lamps for the japanese market at a totally rotten K 70 in the area of Cork (an unbelivable joke: offerend in the newspaper as "good condition", but at least a car, owned by a "Messie", fully loaded with garbage. One single mirror was usable, not any other part more).

@Gag: the japanese plates are not exactly American size, they are a bit longer. So trunk-hoods and bumpers for the japanese market are different than the America-version.

antp BE

2007-09-03 18:01

Quote

See here for an example of such case: /vehicle_49728-Nissan-March-K10-1986.html

dsl SX

2018-11-20 01:16

Quote

Local build?? Or from Aus??

Add a comment

You must login to post comments...

Advertising