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Fordson Major with an early Hydrostatic Transmission

Fordson Major in Look at Life: Down on the Farm, Documentary, 1960-1967

Class: Others, Farming vehicle — Model origin: UK

Fordson Major with an early Hydrostatic Transmission

[*][*] Minor action vehicle or used in only a short scene

Comments about this vehicle

AuthorMessage

Sunbar UK

2018-01-25 11:33

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The National College of Agricultural Engineering Wrest Park, Silsoe, Bedfordshire. The 'no gearbox' tractor being demonstrated had, I think, an early Hydrostatic Transmission (HST).

[Image: silso.jpg] [Image: silso2.jpg]

dsl SX

2018-01-25 12:13

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Any link with this experimental Herald??

Sunbar UK

2018-01-25 12:56

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Only I think that both the National Engineering Laboratory and the National College of Agricultural Engineering were government funded they possibly shared some core research?

Sunbar UK

2018-01-25 13:19

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The tractor's development was based on a Lucas system, its not clear to me if the Herald's system also had the same engineering source?


"The first CVT was developed at the National Institute of Agricultural Engineering in 1954 (Hamblin, 1956). The transmission consisted of a variable displacement engine-mounted pump and fixed displacement wheel motors. The basic design was developed in conjunction with Lucas Industrial Equipment during the late 1950s and later a large number of prototypes were tested in agricultural and industrial applications (Eyles and Edghill, 1970)."

David Sayer Cranfield University at Silsoe
National Soil Resources Institute (Engineering Group)
Link to "www.google.co.uk"

mike962 DE

2018-01-25 13:36

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- why do the brits drink their beer warm ?

- because they had LUCAS refrigerators

-- Last edit: 2018-01-25 13:36:48

johnfromstaffs EN

2018-01-25 13:58

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Just another piece of rubbish put about by people who know nothing about proper beer or car electrics.

Sunbar UK

2018-01-25 14:07

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... and refrigerators.

the sad biker UK

2018-01-25 14:15

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Beer should be cool, not chilled, Lager is a different matter!

mike962 DE

2018-01-25 15:08

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The Lucas motto: "Get home before dark"

Lucas is the patent holder for the short circuit.

Lucas - Inventor of the first intermittent wiper.

Lucas - Inventor of the self-dimming headlamp.

The three position Lucas switch - Dim, Flicker and Off.

The Original Anti-Theft Device - Lucas Electrics.


Lucas is an acronym for Loose Unsoldered Connections and Splices

Lucas systems actually uses AC current; it just has a random frequency.
"I have had a Lucas pacemaker for years and have never had any trou..."
If Lucas made guns, wars would not start.

A friend of mine told everybody he never had any electric problems with his Lucas equipment. Today he lives in the countryside, in a large manor with lots of friendly servants around him an an occasional ice cold shower...

Back in the 70's, Lucas decided to diversify its product line and began manufacturing vacuum cleaners. It was the only product they offered which did not suck.

Alexander Graham Bell invented the Telephone.Thomas Edison invented the Light Bulb. Joseph Lucas invented the Short Circuit.

Recommended procedure before taking on a repair of Lucas equipment: Check the position of the stars,kill a chicken and walk three times clockwise around your car chanting:" Oh mighty Prince of Darkness protect your unworthy servant..


Did you hear the one about the guy that peeked into a Land Rover and asked the owner "How can you tell one switch from another at night? They all look the same. " - "He replied, "It does not matter which one you use, nothing happens !"

-- Last edit: 2018-01-25 15:12:52

lightninboy US

2018-01-25 16:40

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:lol:

the sad biker UK

2018-01-25 17:01

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To be fair on uncle Joe, the worst of his reputation came from the bike industry, consider the equipment was almost permanently wet then add in the vibration from a big single or 360deg parallel twin and you've got a recipe for failure.

Nippon Denso (ND) can be as bad, most experienced bikers consider regulator/rectifiers a consumable item.

Baube QC

2018-01-25 17:05

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:lol:

about the vacuum cleaner, do you mean in a good way or the dust did stayed on the floor ?

mike962 DE

2018-01-25 18:22

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the one product which was supposed to suck didn't ... dust stayed on the floor

-- Last edit: 2018-01-25 18:23:35

johnfromstaffs EN

2018-01-25 19:25

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All this stuff has been around for so many years that it has more whiskers than the points of an AC-Delco contact breaker. The fact is that all mass produced cheap motor car electrical equipment is no better or worse than any other, whether it is Lucas, Ducellier, Paris-Rhône, Marelli, Bosch, Houdaille, Wipac or anyone else’s make. The fact that Royces and Bentleys from this era used Lucas electrical equipment counts for a lot. The dynamo and starter motor of my Bentley are both Lucas, both 65 years old, and both still functioning, as is the Delco distributor.

zodiac SE

2018-01-25 20:22

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I've also heard a lot about how bad the Lucas electrics are.
Because of that I was rather worried when I started driving my Ford Zephyr, but apart from some earth connector points, which I've changed, and a new voltage control regulator, all has been fine.
But many people have approached me during the time and told me how bad it is. "Lucas invented the darkness!".

Is it any truth in that, I wonder?
To find out, I've spoken to some people and studied electrical car parts when being at meetings and auto jumbles.

My conclusions are:
- As far as I understand, Lucas was amongst the first companies that dealt with car electrics. There they used positive earth because that leads to less corrosion. Any truth in that?
- I'm not sure about my next statement, but if Lucas was first and patented the positive earth, the next company had to use negative earth to not disturb the patent rights.
- And if that company was Bosch, and subsequently became word leader, that means all the electrical corrosion problems I've dealt with during the years have been unnecessary?
- Otherwise there were acetylene gas lights in the older days, and they were no more reliable, but people were used to them and didn't like modernities.
- When studying lights (mainly from the 50's and 60's), that is fog lights, position lights, indicator lights and many more besides, Lucas stuff is always (I've seen no exceptions so far) more beautifully made. The details are just amazing. Bosch lights usually look rather uninteresting. As do American, French and Italian lights (my opinion!).


What if the problem is in the person that is supposed to maintain the system, which is the owner of the car. If not able, just blame something else!
But I thoroughly believe that the jokes come from the British themselves. Thereafter it has been adopted as the truth and nothing but the truth by people who don’t dare, or have time, to question if it is any truth there at all.

-- Last edit: 2018-01-25 20:26:44

johnfromstaffs EN

2018-01-25 21:21

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I have held long correspondences with American car “enthusiasts” on Hemmings’ blog about this. They seem to think that it is all the gospel truth and these old jokes, like “Fix It Again Toni” are repeated ad nauseam. While there is undoubtedly truth in the cries from those with 70s and 80s cars with electrical problems, especially Leyland era Jaguars, I never experienced failure to get home while covering hundreds of thousands of miles in Rootes, BMC/BL, and Ford cars, and I believe that a lot of electrical failures start with poor maintenance. The big, rugged cars of North America were designed to be used for long periods with little maintenance and worked well under those conditions. Trying the same tactics with a Fiat, Lancia, Triumph or MG soon results in disaster. It’s no good trying to play a Stradivarius with a hacksaw.

I’m sorry, I cannot help with the positive/negative earth question.

lightninboy US

2018-01-25 22:07

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I think positive ground and negative ground can both crud up equally.


Home Improvement s06e06 Episode
It's British! It's a '67 Austin-Healey.
These have a positive ground wiring system that nobody understands.


Cars 2
That's one of the worst engines ever made. It's an old aluminum V-8 engine with a Lucas electrical system and Whitworth bolts!

atom SE

2018-01-25 22:44

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My Ford like all US Fords with 6 volt systems have positive ground and it was a little strange before I got used to it but it's not like learning a new language. Having worked on sixties and seventies Mini, Fiat, Opel and Volvos I don't really understand the fuss with Lucas stuff. I'd guess it makes good jokes that car guys 'think' they get.

zodiac SE

2018-01-26 09:13

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@john:
I have a friend who had a 80's Fiat Regatta somewhere in the 90's.
After a while nothing on the dashboard worked, but it still took him where he was supposed to.

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