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Dirty Harry, Movie, 1971 IMDB

Pictures provided by: wickey, chicomarx, Weasel1984

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Also known as:

  • Smerige klabak (Belgium)
  • Harry, el sucio / Harry el brut (Spain)
  • Likainen Harry (Finland)
  • L'inspecteur Harry (France)
  • Ispettore Callaghan: il caso Scorpio è tuo (Italy)
  • Brudny Harry (Poland)

Comments about this movie

See all comments about this movie and its vehicles

AuthorMessage

clint thrust IE

2007-07-09 21:27

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I think a white Austin 1100 can be seen entering the rainbow painted tunnel as the school bus enters it along with a VW Beetle.

vilero ES

2010-09-22 20:37

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Harry Callahan, at his best: "I know what you're thinking. "Did he fire six shots or only five?" Well, to tell you the truth, in all this excitement I kind of lost track myself. But being as this is a .44 Magnum, the most powerful handgun in the world, and would blow your head clean off, you've got to ask yourself one question: Do I feel lucky? Well, do ya, punk?"

Weasel1984 PL

2010-09-22 20:41

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"Hey, I gots to know". :D

[Image: 265825-00.jpg]
Pics have been replaced by new in HD (please refresh) and some vehicles has been added.
The cars visible from the bar, at the beginning of film, are worth to list. I didn't notice before, that all scenes of the bank robbery were filmed in studio. Some of these cars are visible few times.

There was also this fire truck, used by Harry to succesful and "spectacular" :D saving of the suicide guy [*][*] and bike (I guess H-D servicar???) [*]:
[Image: 265832-xhaley.jpg]

Edit:
Pics of Bell helicopter you will find now at IMPDb.

-- Last edit: 2012-10-01 23:36:17

chicomarx BE

2010-09-22 22:37

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Very nice upgrade!

It earned Clint Eastwood a solid reputation as a fascist.

"This right-wing fantasy about the San Francisco police force as a helpless group (emasculated by the unrealistic liberals) propagandizes for para-legal police power and vigilante justice. The only way that the courageous cop Dirty Harry Callahan can protect the city against the mad hippie killer who terrorizes women and children is by taking the law into his own hands. Harry, who knows what justice is and how to carry it out, is the best there is, a Camelot cop; he got his nickname because he's the dedicated troubleshooter who draws the dirtiest assignments. He is our martyr-stained on our behalf. As suspense craftsmanship, the picture is trim, brutal, and exciting; it was directed in the sleekest style by the veteran urban-action director Don Siegel." (part of the influential review by Pauline Kael)

14Stutz US

2010-09-23 02:09

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Helicopter is an early Bell 206 JetRanger. It wears the factory paint scheme for the first few years of production...plus the added police titles.

ford_guy US

2010-09-23 02:58

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chicomarx wrote It earned Clint Eastwood a solid reputation as a fascist.


Wait, what? :wow:

Weasel1984 PL

2010-09-23 14:53

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Poor Clint. :D These words "fascist", "communist" are so widely used by both sides and many times have nothing to do with reality. :D It is so simple to give such "badge" to someone, who represent different POV and cuts this way the discussion in a showy way (especially if you don't have any more arguments).
Let me to do not agree with mentioned lady. I don't know how it was in California in 1971, but to be honest, the law created by people, probably lost somewhere in their own relativism, which protect more the bandit than victim/potential victim, I do not find any movie fiction. "Dirty Harry" was made more for big audience, than to be some manifesto, but Callahan was definitely right in his lack of understand (and respect) to such ridiculous beaurocracy.
And clinging to the details, why she thought Scorpio was a hippie? Maybe I missed something, but to me it was not so obvious from the film. I belive, the fact, that someone has longer hairs (even not long) didn't indicated any subculture already in the early 70's. On the other hand, isn't it true, that in different 1960's movements, were involved ALSO a simple psychopaths? If we add to this drugs mixed with radical ideology we can be quite close to rather scary events. Coin has two sides, but some prefer to see only one.

Thanks Chicomarx for this text (well a part of it). It is from the movie period, I guess. That would be interesting - such reviews perhaps clearly affected the plot of the next "Magnum Force".

cl82 DE

2010-09-23 18:03

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Yes, Magnum Force was a reaction to the critics and an attempt to weaken the accusations of promoting vigilantism. I've always liked (most of) Eastwood's work which includes both his more action-orientated period of the 60s and 70s and his later, more subtle and sophisticated movies, but it has to be mentioned that he used to be more conservative as a younger man than he is now. Evidence for this thesis can be found in some of the "Dirty Harry" movies. The character of Scorpio for instance wears a peace-badge upon his jacket throughout the whole movie, and it's certainly no coincidence that the lawyer who's responsible for not arresting him after he already has murdered three people is from Berkeley University. And in part three of the series, the bad guys are a bunch of narrow-minded left-wing guerillas. Yet it has to be said that even in this rather mainstream-focussed span of time Eastwood made a number of remarkable movies( both as actor and director) which are completely different and very thoughtful and therefore foreshadowed what was yet to come.

ford_guy US

2010-09-23 19:19

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But I think labels are unnecessary in this case, especially with calling Clint a fascist. Some of the ideas and things mentioned in the movie certainly are true to life, and it might be easier to understand if one was from California. I understand that this movie is 40-years old, but to throw around labels and assumptions like that seems very irresponsible, especially on a site like this one where people just come to see the cars. Maybe such a discussion is better suited for the IMDb boards.

Weasel1984 PL

2010-09-23 19:35

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We are in "comments about this movie". ;) "Label" is correct, I used wrong word "badge". :D
I do not think, it was Chico idea to call Clint fascist, he simply told us what opinions were about him. Such a curiosity.
Conservative he was for sure, but it has nothing to do with fascism.

14Stutz US

2010-09-23 19:37

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Weasel1984 wrote We are in "comments about this movie". ;) Conservative he was for sure, but it has nothing to do with fascism.


Today in the American media and to many outside America...ANY conservative is called a fascist.

ford_guy US

2010-09-23 19:41

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I just thought it was strange for chicomarx to come out and call Clint a fascist like that, I thought it was an inappropriate label. But anyhow, maybe we've just been lost in translation. Carry on ;)

chicomarx BE

2010-09-23 23:15

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ford_guy wrote I just thought it was strange for chicomarx to come out and call Clint a fascist like that, I thought it was an inappropriate label. But anyhow, maybe we've just been lost in translation. Carry on ;)


@ford_guy That was Eastwood's label in the 70s, not my invention. Part of that review I should have quoted. "It's also a remarkably single-minded attack on liberal values with each prejudicial detail in place-a kind of hardhat The Fountainhead. Harry's hippie adversary is pure evil: sniper, rapist, kidnapper, torturer, defiler of all human values. This monster-who wears a peace symbol-stands for everything the audience fears and loathes. The action genre has always had a fascist potential, and it surfaces in this movie."

Pauline Kael was a very influential critic for The New Yorker for decades. Very left-leaning magazine. :) The entire review is in her book "Deeper into Movies". Even if you don't agree with her, her reviews are an excellent read. Tarantino says: "My favorite writer, period. It's gotten to the point where I enjoy reading Kael's reviews of Godard's films more than the actual films themselves."

cl82 wrote Yes, Magnum Force was a reaction to the critics and an attempt to weaken the accusations of promoting vigilantism.


That's true, the following movie has him speaking out against vigilantism. I personally like Clint Eastwood as an actor and as a director, and concerning his politics here's an interesting bit from the NY Times: (Feb. 13, 2005)

Quote How Dirty Harry Turned Commie

Clint Eastwood, a former Republican officeholder (Mayor of Carmel, Calif., in the late 1980's), Nixon appointee to the National Council of the Arts and action hero whose breakthrough role in the Vietnam era was as a vigilante cop, Dirty Harry, whom Pauline Kael famously called "fascist."

No matter. Rush Limbaugh used his radio megaphone to inveigh against the "liberal propaganda" of "Million Dollar Baby," in which Mr. Eastwood plays a crusty old fight trainer who takes on a fledgling "girl" boxer (Hilary Swank) desperate to be a champ. Mr. Limbaugh charged that the film was a subversively encoded endorsement of euthanasia, and the usual gang of ayatollahs chimed in.

"What do you have to give these people to make them happy?" Mr. Eastwood asked when I phoned to get his reaction to his new status as a radical leftist. He is baffled that those "who expound from the right on American values" could reject a movie about a heroine who is "willing to pull herself up by the bootstraps, to work hard and persevere no matter what" to realize her dream. "That all sounds like Americana to me, like something out of Wendell Willkie," he says. "And the villains in the movie include people who are participating in welfare fraud."

His own politics defy neat categorization. He's supported Democrats (including Gray Davis in the pre-Schwarzenegger era) as well as Republicans, professes the libertarian creed of "less government" and "was never a big enthusiast for going to Iraq but never spoke against it once the troops were there." In other words, he's in the same middle as most Americans. "I vote for what I like," he says. "I'm not a loyalist to any party. I'm only a loyalist to the country."


-- Last edit: 2010-09-23 23:50:34

ford_guy US

2010-09-23 23:58

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I understand now chicomarx. Thanks for clearing it up.

chicomarx BE

2010-09-24 00:11

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One last quote maybe:

Quote In "Dirty Harry," Eastwood said to the hippie psychotic, "This is the most powerful handgun in the world, punk. It can blow your head off." The strong quiet man of the action film has been replaced by the emotionally indifferent man. He's the opposite of Bogart, who knew pain. Perhaps the top box-office star in movie business, Eastwood is also the first truly stoned hero in the history of movies. He's inhumanly tranquil, controlled and assured, his gun power makes him the hero of a totally nihilistic dream world.


-- Last edit: 2010-09-24 00:16:31

maxman CA

2013-04-02 02:41

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chicomarx wrote Very nice upgrade!

It earned Clint Eastwood a solid reputation as a fascist.

"This right-wing fantasy about the San Francisco police force as a helpless group (emasculated by the unrealistic liberals) propagandizes for para-legal police power and vigilante justice. The only way that the courageous cop Dirty Harry Callahan can protect the city against the mad hippie killer who terrorizes women and children is by taking the law into his own hands. Harry, who knows what justice is and how to carry it out, is the best there is, a Camelot cop; he got his nickname because he's the dedicated troubleshooter who draws the dirtiest assignments. He is our martyr-stained on our behalf. As suspense craftsmanship, the picture is trim, brutal, and exciting; it was directed in the sleekest style by the veteran urban-action director Don Siegel." (part of the influential review by Pauline Kael)


That's just Pauline Kael. Her reviews are so incredibly laughably bad, and for some reason she constantly throws around the word fascist as if she doesn't even know what it means.

I honestly don't know why anyone takes her seriously.

An obviously stand-in for her gets killed in The Dead Pool. Something about her seems to rub directors the wrong way, since she gets another one in Willow (probably her habit of indiscriminately throwing around the word fascist to describe things she doesn't like).

-- Last edit: 2013-04-02 02:51:10

chicomarx BE

2013-04-02 04:13

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Isn't it a bit of a right wing fantasy? That "an obvious stand-in for her gets killed in The Dead Pool" could confirm it.

To me she's the most interesting film critic, she's so busy crafting the humor in her writings it's often hard to say whether she liked the film or not. On Cary Grant:

"With Gable, sex is inevitable: what is there but sex? Basically, he thinks women are good for only one thing. Grant is interested in the qualities of a particular woman – her sappy expression, her non sequiturs, the way her voice bobbles. She isn’t going to be pushed to the wall as soon as she’s alone with him. With Grant, the social, urban man, there are infinite possibilities for mutual entertainment. He isn’t a conqueror, like Gable. But he’s a winner."

maxman CA

2013-04-02 22:06

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chicomarx wrote Isn't it a bit of a right wing fantasy?


How so?

chicomarx wrote That "an obvious stand-in for her gets killed in The Dead Pool" could confirm it.


Not really. All it really shows is that people don't like her habit of indiscriminately throwing around the term fascist.

chicomarx BE

2013-04-02 22:44

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You're not going to deny the theme isn't right-wing? It calls for more police authority and quick justice, because those hippies have no respect and are getting away with murder.
I don't mean that as a negative, I liked all the Dirty Harry movies. :D
She didn't actually call anyone a fascist, she called the film "fascist medievalism".

G-MANN UK

2013-04-03 01:21

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Maxman, I think if police officers in real life were allowed to swagger around blowing people's heads off with .44 Magnums as they saw fit, people might object to it. :D

Re: the comment about Eastwood's own politics, he's definitely a Republican, isn't he?

-- Last edit: 2013-04-03 01:24:28

chicomarx BE

2013-04-03 01:29

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He's a Libertarian, but he endorsed Mitt Romney. He improvised a slightly painful speech at the Republican convention. You didn't see it?

G-MANN UK

2013-04-03 01:33

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Yes, I've seen it. But he's probably voted Republican for a long time.

chicomarx BE

2013-04-03 01:38

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http://www.newsmeat.com/celebrity_political_donations/Clint_Eastwood.php

maxman CA

2013-04-09 19:04

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G-MANN wrote Maxman, I think if police officers in real life were allowed to swagger around blowing people's heads off with .44 Magnums as they saw fit, people might object to it. :D


When does he do that? He only shoots people who are in the process of committing a crime with a deadly weapon and put his life and the lives of bystanders in danger.

People would have more to say about a police officer who stands by and lets dangerous criminals commit crimes than one who shoots them to protect the public when nonviolent options are unavailable.

-- Last edit: 2013-04-09 19:04:38

Andre Malraux RO

2013-04-09 19:33

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deleted comment

Lateef NO

2013-04-26 23:36

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@progip: the "Ford LTD" you've added is already listed here.

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