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Downton Abbey, TV Series, 2010-?? IMDB

Pictures provided by: CarChasesFanatic

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Comments about this movie

See all comments about this movie and its vehicles

AuthorMessage

14stutz US

2011-06-20 01:17

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Were Ford model Ts really that popular in the UK in period...or are they just more common and easier for film companies to rent today?

mauriceoxford UK

2011-09-25 13:40

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Model T's were built in Britain too, and were the biggest seller here until it was overtaken by the 'Bullnose' Morris Cowley in the 1920s. I would imagine that they were very common before WWI so this series is quite accurate, but also their survival rate is doubly impressive as parts are more plentiful given the global sales of Ford compared to home-produced efforts. Hence for filming work, if you want an 'average' pre-WWI light van, the film companies will more than likely produce a Model T!

vilero ES

2011-10-06 20:18

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Me froto los ojos y ¡No puede ser! CCF ¿eres tú?

CarChasesFanatic ES

2011-10-06 20:26

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Sí! Me he animado con alguna serie últimamente! :D

nzcarnerd NZ

2011-10-09 04:30

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Can someone translate the Spanish?

I remember noticing when the first episode played here that even though it was set in 1912, the Ford Ts were all black radiator cars which were not seen before the middle of 1917 in the US and possibly later in UK. Even the brass radiator model seen in thje first pic on this page is a later example - possibly 1916-17 - because it has a metal cowl. The 1912 cars had a flat wooden dash.

-- Last edit: 2011-10-09 04:31:58

dsl SX

2011-10-09 04:39

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nzcarnerd wrote Can someone translate the Spanish?

Vilero's asking if there are any car chases. CCF says Get real - it's a stupid costume drama.

CarChasesFanatic ES

2011-10-09 11:41

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nzcarnerd wrote Can someone translate the Spanish?

I remember noticing when the first episode played here that even though it was set in 1912, the Ford Ts were all black radiator cars which were not seen before the middle of 1917 in the US and possibly later in UK. Even the brass radiator model seen in thje first pic on this page is a later example - possibly 1916-17 - because it has a metal cowl. The 1912 cars had a flat wooden dash.


He was just surprised to see me here, nothing relevant about the series :) Thanks for the information about the cars though. The second season takes place during 1917.

dsl wrote
Vilero's asking if there are any car chases. CCF says Get real - it's a stupid costume drama.


Hope that was irony :p


-- Last edit: 2011-10-09 11:41:55

G-MANN UK

2011-10-09 20:51

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dsl wrote Vilero's asking if there are any car chases. CCF says Get real - it's a stupid costume drama.


CCF used to ask that question all the time :D

nzcarnerd NZ

2011-10-09 21:09

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The second series starts here next week so hopefully I will get a better look at those unknowns from there. Of those two ambulances the one on the left is a Ford T but the other one is something heavier and on solid tyres. The green truck in the background does not look right to be a T - it might be something else.

Re mauriceoxford's comment he is partly right in that there were many Ts in England pre WW1 - it is just that they were all brass radiator models as the painted radiator did not appear until 1917 - and they would have been vastly outnumbered by local and European products because British production did not start until 1911-12. It wasn't until the 1920s that there were large numbers of Ts but their reign was shortlived. The horsepower tax (introduced in 192?) killed them. They were the only vehicle that was rated for tax at a higher rate than what they actually produced - 22hp for tax and 20hp actual. Compare that with the Austin 7 - 7 taxable and about 13 produced.

-- Last edit: 2011-10-09 21:09:53

antp BE

2011-10-10 16:16

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CarChasesFanatic wrote
Hope that was irony :p

It is dsl! As I said on /vehicle.php?id=126095#Comment996682 :
antp wrote
He does only three things on the site anyway: identifying cars, off-topic with Ingo, and jokes.

And for dsl's post: :lol:

-- Last edit: 2011-10-10 16:17:40

dsl SX

2011-10-10 21:11

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antp wrote ..... and jokes.

Oh well, if you insist. When he was a young boy, Bob Dylan was very shy and had no pals to play with, so he made friends with the insects in his garden, and they liked him too. He used to sit there in the sunshine and they'd all hover round him. He always treasured those moments and it inspired him to write his first song "The ants are my friends, they're blowing in the wind."

chicomarx BE

2011-10-11 02:39

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Abominable!! One more and I'll press the "ban this user" button.

john from Staffs EN

2011-10-30 21:40

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The horsepower tax was introduced in 1921, and was calculated using the formula B x B x N divided by 1613, where B was the bore of the cylinders in millimetres, or 2.5 where the bore was expressed in inches and N was the number of cylinders. The result was then used to arrive at the annual charge for a road fund license for the car, at £1 per horsepower.

http://www.britishmm.co.uk/facts002.asp

Hence the British prediliction for cars of small bore and long stroke, and the reason for the general use of four cylinders for family cars, except Jowetts.

john from Staffs EN

2011-10-31 12:46

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In response to the question concerning the number of Ford Model T vehicles to be seen in Downton Abbey, 41% of all registered vehicles on Britain's roads in 1919 were Fords. Between 1919 and 1921 Ford Britain produced 33,600 cars, Morris in the same period produced 5,280. Morris did not overtake the Model T in production figures until 1924, so a predominance of Fords, including the one owned by my Uncle Sam at the time, is representative. The number of private cars on the roads in Britain in 1919 was 109,705, this had increased to 482356 by 1924, thus the predominance of Fords became diluted.

(A-Z of Cars of the 1920s, Nick Baldwin, Bay View Books 1994, ISBN 1 870979 53 2)

-- Last edit: 2011-10-31 12:48:29

Sunbar UK

2011-11-08 20:41

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@CarChasesFanatic as series 2 has now ended, are you adding any screen caps of 'LD3218' (a 1908 Napier 45hp Type 23) from episode 2.07?

CarChasesFanatic ES

2011-11-12 02:33

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Yes, done :)

14stutz US

2012-02-20 17:49

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john from Staffs wrote In response to the question concerning the number of Ford Model T vehicles to be seen in Downton Abbey, 41% of all registered vehicles on Britain's roads in 1919 were Fords. Between 1919 and 1921 Ford Britain produced 33,600 cars, Morris in the same period produced 5,280. Morris did not overtake the Model T in production figures until 1924,)


Thanks for your reply. I knew that Ford made Ts in the UK, but it's interesting to see how strong sales were in the early day.

nuthatch US

2012-08-01 07:34

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It's disappointing that although the producer and set-dressers on this series were quite scrupulous about period accuracy, they missed the boat so badly with some of the period automobiles. The second season ends in 1920, yet we see a 1925 Sunbeam and numerous Model T Fords that hadn't been built yet. It certainly can't be that there are not enough brass era cars available for films. I wonder why they were so careless about this.

rootbeer1 US

2013-01-28 23:30

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The Fiat Tipo is same era as a 1912 Fiat Tipo runabout that sold January 2013, at Barrett Jackson's Scottsdale Arizona auction for $198,000. The A.C.
is manufactured by the company that in the early 1960's exported cars to USA to Carroll Shelby's facility where Ford V8's were installed and sold as
AC Cobras. A year or 2 later Carroll Shelby got really wild, dropping in monster 427 cubic inch V8's with over 400 horsepower! Pristine Shelby Cobras
have sold for hundreds of thousands, rarest one(s) for in the millions, and are the most replicated(copied) car in the world, available from numerous
manufacturers as kit cars and also as ready to drive versions. They are raced, primarily now in vintage/gentleman races. The Laguna Seca track near
Monterey, CA has annual races where Shelby's are present.

nzcarnerd NZ

2014-01-17 09:33

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The difference re Fiats is that the Tipo 1 has an engine of 1.8 litres and the car sold at the 2013 BJ auction is a US-built Model 55 of 9.4 litres.

Saltchuck CA

2014-07-07 05:37

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Season Four #4

Saltchuck wrote ???

[Image: season44.jpg]


[Image: 44.jpg]

-- Last edit: 2014-07-07 05:40:26

RRR US

2016-02-15 19:11

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I was wondering if Seasons/series 5 and 6 were going to be done? I was specifically interested in a Morris Commercial 1 ton ambulance that appeared in 6.07 at the auto race. It is not the same vehicle (ambulance) that appeared in 6.05 at the residence [reg of EB 7747 which is also listed here in Foyles War]) although both are a Morris Commercial vehicle.
In 6.07 the Morris has a registration of BS 8045 and in researching this British reg it was assigned to a 1904 Oldsmobile in 2009.
Thoughts?
thank you

-- Last edit: 2016-02-15 20:06:03

johnfromstaffs EN

2016-02-15 23:53

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I cannot offer any thoughts about the vehicle itself, but can tell you about the registration number, to an extent.

BS was a series allocated for use from 01/01/1904 by the county council of Orkney. By 1964 they had reached BS7353, but ceased issuing at BS7777. On 01/01/1965 they commenced issuing under the then current system at ABS1C. (C being the year letter for 1965, and the A being an index letter, i.e. ABS999C could be followed by BBS1C.

The old type numbers from BS8000 to BS9999 were then used by the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Authority for "age related" marks for old vehicles that had lost their original mark for some reason.

dsl SX

2016-02-16 00:29

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"BS 8045 is a silver 2004 Peugeot 407 SE HDi with a numberplate first registered in Orkney. This Saloon was first used on the road on 21 December 2004. BS 8045 has also previously been associated with FV54URY." FV54URY goes nowhere useful now, but would match a car first registered in Dec 2004.

DVLA gives BS 8045 as still attached to the Peugeot as a live registration. However the link to a 1904 Oldsmobile is confirmed by several online references - eg this one from 2010 London-Brighton run - https://www.flickr.com/photos/28439790@N03/5213898239 . However this page suggests that car had become OF 8413 for the 2011 L-B run, which is sort-of confirmed by

"OF8413 is a black/red 1989 Oldsmobile with a numberplate first registered in Birmingham. This Unknown was first used on the road on Monday 1st May 1989. OF8413 has also previously been associated with BS8045" and DVLA
Registration number: OF 8413
✔ Taxed Tax due: 01 July 2016
MOT Exempt
Vehicle make OLDSMOBILE
Date of first registration 01 May 1989
Year of manufacture 1906
Cylinder capacity (cc) 7cc
Vehicle status Tax not due
Vehicle colour BLACK

.... but there are some bizarre bits of detail in those records. Also noted that there seem to be an avalanche of 1902-04 Curved dash Oldsmobiles with BS 8xxx registrations according to this page - all presumably issued in the circumstances jfs describes above, and in many cases may be similarly volatile to changes so treat with caution. But WTF is going on - is America sending all its Curved Dashes to Britain in a mad panic in case The Donald and his ludicrous wig get elected??

RRR US

2016-02-16 23:00

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First things first dsl. Interesting that you mention The Donald and his wig. Early on in the states the Republican party was actually known as the Whig Party so I guess he is representing the correct party :) OK, enough with politics

Regarding the registration WOW! confusing to say the least. Surprised to see that it has been attached to so many vehicles as I thought a plate stayed with a vehicle for the life of the car. I believe I found the vehicle but in a blurry photo from an episode of Jeeves and Wooster but the number plate is not readable and probably different anyway considering the above. /vehicle_70079-Morris-Commercial-1-Ton-Ambulance-T-Type-1932.html In viewing the Jeeves episode due to the camera angle and car movement the reg is totally unreadable.

I do appreciate the info.

-- Last edit: 2016-02-16 23:02:31

dsl SX

2016-02-17 00:14

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We had Whigs in UK - they were our first political party, dating back apparently to 1678, so US Whigs may have started as an import from UK colonists?? But long dead now - their apparent successors in UK now are the Liberal party, who are about as useful as Woolworths gift vouchers or 8-track cassettes.

But with these UK plates lots of things can happen. As a huge generalisation with holes big enough to drive buses through, most UK vehicles would tend to keep the registrations given when they were first registered new from the showrooms. However this can change for cherished number transfers where people want a personal plate (their initials or something relating to the car type - eg 250 GTO - or whatever - some people like to keep an old plate if it's been in the family for a couple of generations etc). That means that if they sell the car but keep the plate for their next car, the first car needs a new registration to be issued. If it's an older car it may well get one of these unused-in-period series; similarly if a car is imported from a different country, it gets registered here in similar procedures.

But these plates are arbitrary, and in many cases the new owners may be the sort of people who like to personalise their registrations - so soon afterwards they find "their" new combination and switch it over, so the first plate often dies fairly quickly. BS plates have an additional quirk in that many folk in Orkney try to get them because there is no longer a specific Orkney plate series, so the Peugeot with BS 8045 may now live there. Or it could have been bought by someone called Bill Smith or similar initials as a personalised plate. And the Oldsmobile's current owner might have OF initials, and so on.

In summary, if a car loses its original plate or gets registered in UK for the first time long after it was made, these registrations are procedural identifiers to satisfy legal requirements, and not really part of the car's heritage. So they become expendable as and when the owner wants something they like better. But the owner of a 1904 Oldsmobile first registered here in 1904 and which has lived here all its life would almost certainly regard that plate as a valuable attribute of the car's pedigree, so would never change it.

chicomarx BE

2016-02-17 00:32

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It's not a wig but a hairline lift. Scalp flap surgery to eliminate bald spots whilst maximizing the area of real hair.

johnfromStaffs EN

2016-02-17 13:43

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Speaking from experience of one who has a personal numberplate carrying my initials, when the car is changed for a new one the personal number is removed, and the car reverts to its original issue unless further action is taken by the new owner. The new replacement car is then issued with a new plate by the selling garage, and the personal number transferred onto the new car after a few days. The process then repeats as the car is updated.

Since I always buy new cars for my daily driver, I don't know if this process is the same on used vehicles.

I would add that I am extremely proud of the large expanse of hairless skin atop my cranium, it was the product of some superb genetic inheritance and a lot of hard work. I would not wish to look like the idiot Trump, who would not be any form of rôle model for me.

-- Last edit: 2016-02-17 13:55:32

dsl SX

2016-02-17 14:11

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johnfromStaffs wrote I always buy new cars for my daily driver ..


Agreed - staff motivation is important. Mine also get issued with brand new uniforms every six months.

johnfromStaffs wrote I would add that I am extremely proud of the large expanse of hairless skin atop my cranium...


Another advantage of being a slaphead is that we can hear snowflakes.

RRR US

2016-02-17 17:07

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Finally figured out the photo uploading Here is the Morris ambulance (episode 6.07) and view of the registration plate [Image: 607a.jpg] and [Image: 607.jpg]
Very interesting discussion of the plates and all the changes. I guess would be difficult to tell where this vehicle obtained the BS 8045 plate. Perhaps a private or commercial film rental outfit.

Plus you (UK) don't seem to use false registration plates as is done in the US for film and TV. Especially when filming in LA when they are supposed to be in NY or Washington DC, etc.

-- Last edit: 2016-02-17 21:57:36

ryantee82 US

2016-02-22 05:34

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There are some Bentleys in the racing episodes in the final season, some of them classic British racing green. Anyone have any idea what models they are?

johnfromstaffs EN

2016-04-02 16:00

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ryantee82 wrote There are some Bentleys in the racing episodes in the final season, some of them classic British racing green. Anyone have any idea what models they are?



The Bentleys amongst the racing cars are: -

White 1922 Bentley Tourist Trophy, No 6
White/Red 1922 Bentley Tourist Trophy replica, No 7
Light Green 1920s Works Team Car 3 Litre, No 8
Dark Green Bentley 3 Litre Red Label speed model, No 10
Black Bentley 3 Litre Vanden Plas two seater, No 14

For further details see the Bentley Drivers Club Review No 304, April 2016, page 8 onwards.

Also 2 Bugattis (1 & 2); Riley (3); Newton (4); Alvis (5); SCAT (9); Sunbeam (15) and Vauxhall (12).

-- Last edit: 2016-04-02 17:00:02

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